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.
"Somebody owns that gas station.
It's some brand of gasoline. "
Put the brand in there, that makes it real.
There was a productplacement department
at the studio that hadjust gotten started...
...and they were trying to cram
all kinds ofstuff at us.
We would nix anything that didn't work too well.
Shell gasoline, for example...
...would have paid more
for a placement than Texaco did...
...but Shell didn't change theirlogo.
So Texaco was the perfect gas station...
...because, how different a Texaco station
looked in the '50s, compared to the '80s.
The same with Pepsi versus Coke.
A Coke bottle in the '50s and a Coke bottle
in the '80s were the same...
...but a Pepsi logo was completely different.
When we talk about the sequels, we'll tell you
all the productplacement horrorstories.
Nobody cares aboutproductplacement
until they know the movie...
...is going to be a hit.
That's one problem with sequels.
There is one story I've got to tell you.
The productplacement department
hired this real sleazy guy.
A lot of these productplacement guys
are sleazy...
...because they try to figure out
how to graft these corporations...
...and make these ridiculous promises.
So he made this deal
with the California Raisin Board...
...that Back to the Future
was going to do for raisins...
...what E.T. did for Reese's Pieces.
They came to me with this proposal
to put raisins in the movie.
I'm saying, "What brand?
Sun-Maid Raisins?" "No. Just raisins.
"Can'tyou have a bowl of raisins at the dance?"
I'm going, "A bowl of raisins
looks like a bowl of dirt.
"How is that going to photograph?"
If we can'tput a brand name somewhere....
They had taken $50,000
from the California Raisin Board...
...for this placement
that wasn't going to happen in the movie.
Finally, what we gave them was...
...the bum on the bench in 1985,
when the DeLorean comes back at the end...
...itsays "California Raisins" on that bus bench.
That was what came out of that deal.
When the California Raisin Board saw it,
they were livid.
I didn't realize at the time
they'd already actually paid the money.
They told the studio
they were going to sue them...
...and the lawyer at the studio called me
and asked me aboutit.
I said, "You'd bettersettle
and give them back their money...
"... because I'd be happy
to be a witness for them. "
Because of the way they'djust tried to...
...force this on us,
and we weren't going to do it.
So the California Raisin Board
ended up notpaying for that exposure.
The lesson I learned on this,
in the subsequentsequels...
...was never do productplacement.
Ever. Anymore.
The only real way to do productplacement
is to getpermission and then get cooperation.
Ifyou're going to do Texaco,
and they give you signs...
...and uniforms and stuff,
thatyou don't have to make.
That's the only way.
I never take money anymore, because...
-... you've got another creative person.
-You've got anotherproducer...
...that's saying,
"What am I getting for my money?"
Productplacementjustisn't worth it.
You've touched on it throughout
this whole discussion, but I'mjust wondering...
...ifyou could tell us what was
your favorite part of making this film.
My favorite part of making this film was writing it.
The actual making of the movie,
I don't remember any good times.
Seeing the movie work
when it was finally put up on the screen...
...that was a thrill. But the actual shooting
of the movie wasjust...
...survival. It was cold.
I remember never having enough sleep,
always being half-asleep.
I was the most unhealthy I ever was
when I made this movie.
I was the fattest, and the most...
...out ofshape and sick that I ever was,
making this movie.
So, I guess, the writing and the finishing
were the favorite parts.
And the actual shooting wasjustsurvival.
I think the best moment I had on the set
was Michael J. Fox's first day.
When he walked in front of the camera
and he

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