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thought, "Some major corporation
could be working on it. "
Then we said, "No, we don'tlike the idea that
a major corporation is working on time travel. "
That opens up a big can of worms
that we didn't want to deal with.
We thought that the American myth is...
...that there's a guy who, in his garage...
...invented the automobile engine
that gets 200 miles to the gallon.
He invented the reusable match
that the match companies...
...won'tlet us have
because it'll put them out of business.
The car companies won'tlet us have the engine.
That's the guy that would invent time travel.
And he would look like Dr. Emmett Brown.
One of the things that we keptstressing
to our art department...
...and the people that we hired
to help design the DeLorean...
...was thatit really needed to look dangerous...
...and look like it was builtin somebody's garage.
It couldn't have a real Star Trek machined look...
...because a guy that's trying
to inventstuffin his garage...
...wouldjuststick something on the side
of his car temporarily to see ifit worked.
Then he'd forget thatit was temporary.
He'd putsome other coil on there.
Pretty soon you'd have this big mishmash.
So we wanted it to look dangerous.
At the same time, because it was nuclear...
...we did do some homework on nuclear reactors.
Those big vents that are on the back...
...those are supposed to be cooling towers,
like you have at a nuclearpowerplant.
After the plutonium fires off, you have...
...all this big steam come out of there because
that's what would happen in a nuclear reaction.
So we did actually try to have
some sense oflogic...
...that we could stick to
and make sense out of, that was a guide.
But as far as the actual nuts and bolts
of time travel itself...
...that's one of the things
that Bob and I were really proud of.
We were absolutely fanatics about dealing with...
...what the real rules of time travel would be.
We basically based our time-travel theories
on The Time Machine by H.G. Wells.
Simply, we stuck to that one...
...which is thatyou travel through time,
you don't travel through space.
Most ofyour time-travel stories and movies
make that fatal mistake.
You're in California,
and you travel back to ancient Rome.
How did you get to Rome,
ifyou're in this latitude and longitude?
And in the H.G. Wells stories,
the time machine never moved in space...
...except at the very end,
when he drags it a few feet.
Right.
So that's exactly what Bob and I did
in how our time machine worked.
We were very careful. As a matter of fact,
I wasjust thinking aboutit...
...as I was watching
the end of the moviejust now.
I remembered that we had....
The whole reason why we had the car
not be able to start...
...after he got back, at the end of the movie,
to the future...
...was so that we didn't have to deal
with the duplication of two DeLoreans.
We only had to deal
with him being duplicated once.
And that one paradox, we cleaned up real quick.
And, of course,
ifyou talk to all the time-travel scientists...
...and the people who study this stuff...
...they think that we'll probably be able
to figure out how to travel into the future.
Traveling to the past will be much more difficult
because of the paradoxes involved.
Eric Stoltz was in the movie
prior to Michael J. Fox.
Can you tell us why you had to re-cast
the role of Marty?
The lesson that I learned was...
...you have to stick to your convictions
at all costs, no matter what.
What happened to me....
It was completely my fault,
and I miscast Eric Stoltz.
I didn't know it at the time. I felt
I was going to be able to make it work.
I had always envisioned Michael in the part...
...but he was doing this TVseries.
And conventional wisdom
was thatyou can'tpossibly do...
...a feature film with an actor
who's in a TVseries. It's impossible.
One of the other mandates
I was given by Mr. Sheinberg was...
...if I didn't have the movie for

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